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Although this OG method is still going strong, a whole new wave of style “bloggers” are upsetting the system by ditching the website entirely and focusing solely on social media. Not to be confused with DJs, models, fashion editors, or It Girls (who occupy an entirely separate sphere of Insta-fame), they have built their numbers gradually and from the ground up. Thanks to their unique aesthetics, and that je ne sais quoi quality that makes thousands of people click “follow,” they represent a new kind of grassroots celebrity-making movement that is proving to have just as much value as traditional web publishing.

Unlike most bloggers, who start their sites as a way to post daily outfits, these girls’ massive followings didn’t originate from #OOTDs. L.A.-based Instagrammer Whitney Cox of @whitneybearr remembers: “Originally, I wasn’t posting style pictures — it was just pictures of my cat and selfies with my friends. But, I started posting pictures of my daily outfits, and friends and colleagues really liked what I was doing, so I’ve been doing it ever since.” Today, Cox’s account boasts more than 24,000 followers, all of whom obsess over her ’90s-inspired West Coast style.

London Based Photographer – Charles Hieghts

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Although this OG method is still going strong, a whole new wave of style “bloggers” are upsetting the system by ditching the website entirely and focusing solely on social media. Not to be confused with DJs, models, fashion editors, or It Girls (who occupy an entirely separate sphere of Insta-fame), they have built their numbers gradually and from the ground up. Thanks to their unique aesthetics, and that je ne sais quoi quality that makes thousands of people click “follow,” they represent a new kind of grassroots celebrity-making movement that is proving to have just as much value as traditional web publishing.

Unlike most bloggers, who start their sites as a way to post daily outfits, these girls’ massive followings didn’t originate from #OOTDs. L.A.-based Instagrammer Whitney Cox of @whitneybearr remembers: “Originally, I wasn’t posting style pictures — it was just pictures of my cat and selfies with my friends. But, I started posting pictures of my daily outfits, and friends and colleagues really liked what I was doing, so I’ve been doing it ever since.” Today, Cox’s account boasts more than 24,000 followers, all of whom obsess over her ’90s-inspired West Coast style.

The life of a supermodel

fas

Although this OG method is still going strong, a whole new wave of style “bloggers” are upsetting the system by ditching the website entirely and focusing solely on social media. Not to be confused with DJs, models, fashion editors, or It Girls (who occupy an entirely separate sphere of Insta-fame), they have built their numbers gradually and from the ground up. Thanks to their unique aesthetics, and that je ne sais quoi quality that makes thousands of people click “follow,” they represent a new kind of grassroots celebrity-making movement that is proving to have just as much value as traditional web publishing.

Unlike most bloggers, who start their sites as a way to post daily outfits, these girls’ massive followings didn’t originate from #OOTDs. L.A.-based Instagrammer Whitney Cox of @whitneybearr remembers: “Originally, I wasn’t posting style pictures — it was just pictures of my cat and selfies with my friends. But, I started posting pictures of my daily outfits, and friends and colleagues really liked what I was doing, so I’ve been doing it ever since.” Today, Cox’s account boasts more than 24,000 followers, all of whom obsess over her ’90s-inspired West Coast style.

Black is the new red

thinking-lady

Although this OG method is still going strong, a whole new wave of style “bloggers” are upsetting the system by ditching the website entirely and focusing solely on social media. Not to be confused with DJs, models, fashion editors, or It Girls (who occupy an entirely separate sphere of Insta-fame), they have built their numbers gradually and from the ground up. Thanks to their unique aesthetics, and that je ne sais quoi quality that makes thousands of people click “follow,” they represent a new kind of grassroots celebrity-making movement that is proving to have just as much value as traditional web publishing.

Unlike most bloggers, who start their sites as a way to post daily outfits, these girls’ massive followings didn’t originate from #OOTDs. L.A.-based Instagrammer Whitney Cox of @whitneybearr remembers: “Originally, I wasn’t posting style pictures — it was just pictures of my cat and selfies with my friends. But, I started posting pictures of my daily outfits, and friends and colleagues really liked what I was doing, so I’ve been doing it ever since.” Today, Cox’s account boasts more than 24,000 followers, all of whom obsess over her ’90s-inspired West Coast style.

The New Styles of 2016

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Although this OG method is still going strong, a whole new wave of style “bloggers” are upsetting the system by ditching the website entirely and focusing solely on social media. Not to be confused with DJs, models, fashion editors, or It Girls (who occupy an entirely separate sphere of Insta-fame), they have built their numbers gradually and from the ground up. Thanks to their unique aesthetics, and that je ne sais quoi quality that makes thousands of people click “follow,” they represent a new kind of grassroots celebrity-making movement that is proving to have just as much value as traditional web publishing.

Unlike most bloggers, who start their sites as a way to post daily outfits, these girls’ massive followings didn’t originate from #OOTDs. L.A.-based Instagrammer Whitney Cox of @whitneybearr remembers: “Originally, I wasn’t posting style pictures — it was just pictures of my cat and selfies with my friends. But, I started posting pictures of my daily outfits, and friends and colleagues really liked what I was doing, so I’ve been doing it ever since.” Today, Cox’s account boasts more than 24,000 followers, all of whom obsess over her ’90s-inspired West Coast style.